Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

February 26 2013

10:49

The man who's crashing the techno-hype party

Jim Giles, consultant

evhr_4.00320893.jpg

Get your big data groove on at an "I ♥ Facebook" party - or don't (Image: Stefano Dal P/Contrasto/Eyevine)

Evgeny Morozov does a good job of dispelling "big data" hype in To Save Everything, Click Here, but fails to explore the way we shape the tech we use

IF SILICON VALLEY is a party, Evgeny Morozov is the guy who turns up late and spoils the fun. The valley loves ambitious entrepreneurs with world-changing ideas. Morozov is, in his own words, an "Eastern European curmudgeon". He's wary of quick fixes and irritated by hype. He's the guy who saunters over to the technophiles gathered around the punch bowl and tells them, perhaps in too much detail, how misguided they are.

click_here_cover.jpg

Morozov should be invited all the same, because he brings a caustic yet thoughtful scepticism that is usually missing from debates about technology. Remember the claims that Facebook and Twitter, having helped power the Arab Spring, would lead to a more open and democratic world? If you heard a dissenting voice, it was probably Morozov's: in his 2011 book The Net Delusion, and also in New Scientist, he pointed out that dictators can use social media to spread propaganda and identify activists. The web is a medium for both liberation and oppression.

Now Morozov is crashing another party. This one is in full swing, filled with feverish talk of algorithms and the cloud and big data. Here's Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, describing how his site tracks our personal interests so that it can serve up the news we most care about. And that's computer pioneer Gordon Bell holding forth on "life-logging". For about a decade he has worn a digital camera that takes frequent shots of his surroundings, which helps supplement his memory.

Enter the curmudgeon. Morozov says people like Zuckerberg and Bell espouse Silicon Valley philosophies that are pervasive but shallow. Bell's desire to catalogue everything, for example, is an example of "solutionism": the relentless drive to fix and to optimise; to take problems - in this case an imperfect biological memory - and propose solutions. This rush for solutions prevents us from thinking about the causes of the problems, and whether, in fact, they are problems at all.

Morozov's right: a digital catalogue of the books we have read and scenes we have witnessed is not, as Bell claims, the basis for more truthful recollections, unless your primary concern is the colour of the socks you wore one day in 2007. There are many things that are important - the mood in a room, a person's demeanour - but too intangible to be captured by a camera, or any other form of technology. Even if they could be, it is far from certain that our future selves would benefit from being able to "recall" these things.

His other bugbear is "internet-centrism": the belief that the internet has inherent properties that should dictate the form of the solutions we pursue. Take the idea that governments should publish data on issues like crime and court cases. To an internet-centrist, this data should be as open and searchable as possible. Morozov wants to know why. Maps of crime data can drive down house prices, worsening a cycle of decline. And publicising the names of trial witnesses can lead to intimidation. The desire for openness requires real trade-offs, and it is naive to assume that a technology can tell us how to handle them. "To suppose that 'the Internet', like the Bible or the Koran, contains simple answers... is to believe that it operates according to laws as firm as those of gravity," he writes.

It is important that someone is countering techno-hype, yet this book lacks the punch of Morozov's earlier writings. It reads like he really did imagine himself crashing a Silicon Valley party and lecturing the attendees, because the book, essentially, is a series of rebuttals of prominent technologists. There is little in the way of practical alternatives. By my count, Morozov dedicates 317 pages to attacking solutionism and internet-centrism, and 33 pages to thinking about how to move beyond them. By taking aim at the technologists, Morozov averts his gaze from something more important: the way that technologies are actually used.

This is most clear in the chapter on the media, in which he worries about technology that allows news organisations to track what people read. The result, he fears, will be a whittling away of less-popular but important types of news, like reporting on poverty. Meanwhile, sites like Facebook are profiling us and using algorithms to feed us news they think we will enjoy, limiting serendipitous discoveries that open us up to new events and ways of thinking.

These are legitimate fears, but they predate the internet. Newspapers and magazines have long used focus groups to gauge reactions to content, sometimes culling and expanding sections in accordance with this feedback. The feedback on digital media may be more rapid and fine-grained, but that does not mean that editors are now slaves to it. A good editor knows that readers want to be challenged as well as entertained; to read about topics they love, and those they may come to love. This involves balancing audience feedback with an instinct for a story. It is nothing new.

This is true even at sites that embrace the algorithmic approach. At Buzzfeed.com, stories are designed to maximise the chances that they will be shared on social media (one headline as I write: "Here Is A Horse Playing A Recorder With Its Nose"). In 2011, the site hired a notable political reporter and tasked him with generating scoops - about politics, not horses. Last year, in a move headed by a different editor, the site began publishing long-form features. Will these new sections generate as many hits as cat videos? Probably not. But Buzzfeed founder Jonah Peretti, whom Morozov dismisses as the "king of memes", presumably knows that the site will be stronger with this richer content added, regardless of what the page-view figures say.

This is the way that technologies are used in real life. They are shaped and adapted by people that use them, based on personal needs and histories. Editors can make use of new audience data without bowing to the algorithms. People can log aspects of their lives - perhaps miles run, or calories consumed - without signing up to Bell's eccentric ideas. Many of us like the connectivity that Facebook brings, but that does not mean we swallow Zuckerberg's self-serving philosophy. Technology shapes us, for sure, but we shape it, too. That process is extremely complex, and it cannot be critiqued by focusing solely on the hype.

This article appeared in print under the headline "Crashing the techno-hype party"

Book information
To Save Everything, Click Here by Evgeny Morozov
Allen Lane/PublicAffairs
£20/$28.99

Follow @CultureLabNS on Twitter

Like us on Facebook



February 13 2012

10:23

The dark side of the personalised internet

Andrew Keen, contributor

Thumbnail image for dailyyou.jpgJOSEPH TUROW'S invaluable The Daily You is a warning about the impact of the "Web 3.0" revolution - though he doesn't use the term - on individual freedom and privacy.

Coined by Reid Hoffman, the Silicon Valley venture capitalist and co-founder of LinkedIn, the term Web 3.0 defines our digitally networked age of "real identities generating massive amounts of data". It is via this avalanche of personal data, available through networks like Facebook, Foursquare, Google and The Huffington Post that, Turow warns, "the new advertising industry is defining your identity and your world".

It wasn't supposed to turn out like this, Turow, a professor of communication at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, wryly notes. In the first flush of the digital revolution, optimists like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Nicholas Negroponte and Harvard University's Yochai Benkler were promising a web of "The Daily Me" in which the consumer would be empowered to "define themselves" through the democratic openness of the internet. But the bright promise of The Daily Me has been eclipsed by the dark reality of The Daily You - an online world in which we are being persistently "peeked" at and "poked" by data mining and analytics companies like Rapleaf, Next Jump, Acxiom, Daily Me and Medicx Media.

The root of the problem, Turow explains, is the disappearance of boundaries between advertising and content that shaped 20th-century media. Because it is hard to generate significant revenue through selling online banner advertising, web publishers now cosy up to advertisers by offering them access to the personal data we reveal every time we go online.

"It's a new world and we are only at the beginning," Turow writes of this creepy set-up in which the consumer, rather than being king, has become the serf of an increasingly seductive and coercive advertising industry. And it is only going to get creepier, he warns, as television and the internet merge, and services like Google TV transform the 20th-century viewer into 21st-century data points that are bundled up and sold on to advertisers.

So what is to be done? Here, Turow is at his least convincing. "The train has already left the station," he writes, ominously, before falling back on anodyne solutions like to "teach our children well - early and often" and encouraging the US Congress to pass "Do Not Track" legislation, which limits gathering consumer data online.

No, what really needs to be done is for all of us to buy Turow's book. In guiding us through the ways in which, whether we know it or not, we are generating massive amounts of personal data online, The Daily You is required reading in today's Web 3.0 age.

Book Information
The Daily You: how the new advertising industry is defining your identity and your worth
by Joseph Turow
Published by: Yale University Press
£20/$28

Follow @CultureLabNS on Twitter

Like us on Facebook



Sponsored post
feedback2020-admin
04:05

January 11 2012

21:19

Changing Media, Changing China: Susan Shirk

Changing Media, Changing China: Susan Shirk
Susan Shirk, professor of political science at the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego, discussed how the Internet and media are changing Chinese politics and vice versa during a National Committee program on April 25.

The National Committee on U.S.-China Relations is the leading nonprofit nonpartisan organization that encourages understanding of China and the United States among citizens of both countries.


Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 21:00:00 -0700
Location: New York, NY, Jones Day, National Committee on United States-China Relations
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/04/25/Changing_Media_Changing_China_Susan_Shirk
16:56

ICANN: The Next Big .thing: New Top-Level Domains

ICANN: The Next Big .thing: New Top-Level Domains
On January 12, 2010, ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, will open a process that could trigger a dramatic expansion of the Internet and launch a new era of online innovation. We are familiar with .com, .org, .net, among the roughly two dozen generic top-level domains currently occupying the Internets addressing system. Hundreds, possibly thousands of new gTLDs, could be moving in within a year. The program is not without risks and not for everyone. Understanding the marketing opportunities, the application process, and the programs built-in trademark protections is important even if a new gTLD is not for you.
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2012 00:00:00 -0800
Location: Washington, DC, The Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW,
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2012/01/11/ICANN_The_Next_Big_thing_New_Top-Level_Domains

December 12 2011

22:18

Brewster Kahle: Universal Access to All Knowledge

Brewster Kahle: Universal Access to All Knowledge
As founder and librarian of the storied Internet Archive (deemed impossible by all when he started it in 1996), Brewster Kahle has practical experience behind his universalist vision of access to every bit of knowledge ever created, for all time, ever improving.

He will speak to questions such as these:

Can we make a distributed web of books that supports vending and lending? How can our machines learn by reading these materials? Can we reconfigure the information to make interactive question answering machines? Can we learn from past human translations of documents to seed an automatic version? And, can we learn how to do optical character recognition by having billions of correct examples? What compensation systems will best serve creators and networked users? How do we preserve petabytes of changing data?
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2011 19:30:00 -0800
Location: San Francisco, CA, The Cowell Theater, Long Now Foundation
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/11/30/Brewster_Kahle_Universal_Access_to_All_Knowledge

December 06 2011

01:30

Joi Ito: Innovation in Open Networks

Joi Ito: Innovation in Open Networks
Moore's Law and the Internet have dramatically lowered the cost of the creation and distribution of information, fundamentally changing the way we collaborate. We no longer live in a world of central control but rather in ecosystem of "small pieces loosely joined" with innovation on the edges. Open source software and open standards thrive in this environment and push the networks to be even more open, making it possible that the agility we see in software and consumer Internet services may spread to hardware.

Joichi Ito will show what startups, the MIT Media Lab and citizen geiger counters in Japan have in common.
Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2011 08:30:00 -0800
Location: New York, NY, Japan Society, Japan Society
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/11/10/Joi_Ito_Innovation_in_Open_Networks

September 27 2011

09:50

Tracking online fraud across the globe

Andrew Keen, contributor

Dark_Market_175.jpgAT THE beginning of DarkMarket, a fast-paced journey through the murkiness of the internet underworld, Misha Glenny arrives on the Google campus in Mountain View, California. Describing what he calls the "trance-like smile" of the people he meets at the Googleplex, Glenny writes: "I cannot quite gauge whether this is a dream or a nightmare."

I suspect that Glenny wrote DarkMarket with a similar smile fixed to his face. Certainly, the book has the qualities and drawbacks of both a dream and a nightmare. This story of big-league online credit card thieves is a vertiginous narrative - moving with sometimes-bewildering speed around the globe from, say, Istanbul, Turkey, through to Scunthorpe, UK.

A frenetic story of hackers and online thieves, DarkMarket moves in cybertime, switching cities, countries and continents with such speed that we might as well be on the internet itself. Indeed, Glenny's narrative style is akin to an online fantasy, more like the infinite video games to which all the hackers are addicted, rather than a traditional non-fiction book.

The problem with DarkMarket is that while it is compelling on the cyberthieves and cybercops - who, as in all good crime stories, sometimes turn out to be the same people - it is weak on context. Glenny seems so infatuated with cybercriminality that he forgets to explain why it matters to the rest of us.

So, I'm afraid, DarkMarket is rather like one of those dreams or nightmares that is instantly forgotten as soon as you wake up.

Book Information
DarkMarket: Cyberthieves, cybercops and you,
by Misha Glenny
Published by: Bodley Head/Knopf
£20/$26.95


June 22 2011

19:18

Funny or Die's Dick Glover: The World Laughs With You

Funny or Die's Dick Glover: The World Laughs With You
The World Laughs With You: How Funny or Die Made Web Video Work

Dick Glover, Funny or Die
in conversation with Jason Tanz, WIRED

NExTWORK is a one-day, interdisciplinary conference that will feature world-renowned business leaders, technologists, and thinkers exploring the promise and peril of the network's future, as well as the most pressing digital issues and opportunities today.
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2011 13:00:00 -0700
Location: New York, NY, Tribeca Rooftop, WIRED
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/06/22/Funny_or_Dies_Dick_Glover_The_World_Laughs_With_You
18:00

Google's Vinton G. Cerf: An Internet Founding Father

Google's Vinton G. Cerf: An Internet Founding Father
An Internet Founding Father Looks Forward

Vinton G. Cerf, Google
in conversation with Steven Levy, WIRED via Skype

NExTWORK is a one-day, interdisciplinary conference that will feature world-renowned business leaders, technologists, and thinkers exploring the promise and peril of the network's future, as well as the most pressing digital issues and opportunities today.
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2011 11:00:00 -0700
Location: New York, NY, Tribeca Rooftop, WIRED
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/06/22/Googles_Vinton_G_Cerf_An_Internet_Founding_Father
17:39

Reality Check: A Network in Crisis?

Reality Check: A Network in Crisis?
Reality Check: A Network in Crisis?

Paul Sagan, CEO, Akamai Technologies
Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks
Tim Wu, Federal Trade Commission; Columbia Law School

Moderated by Steven Levy, WIRED

NExTWORK is a one-day, interdisciplinary conference that will feature world-renowned business leaders, technologists, and thinkers exploring the promise and peril of the network's future, as well as the most pressing digital issues and opportunities today.
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2011 09:55:00 -0700
Location: New York, NY, Tribeca Rooftop, WIRED
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/06/22/Reality_Check_A_Network_in_Crisis
17:15

A Conversation with Jimmy Fallon and Sean Parker

A Conversation with Jimmy Fallon and Sean Parker
A Conversation with Jimmy Fallon and Sean Parker

Jimmy Fallon, Late Night With Jimmy Fallon
Sean Parker, Founders Fund

NExTWORK is a one-day, interdisciplinary conference that will feature world-renowned business leaders, technologists, and thinkers exploring the promise and peril of the network's future, as well as the most pressing digital issues and opportunities today.
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2011 11:15:00 -0700
Location: New York, NY, Tribeca Rooftop, WIRED
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/06/22/A_Conversation_with_Jimmy_Fallon_and_Sean_Parker

June 08 2011

18:42

Flash of Genius: The Information Entrepreneur

Flash of Genius: The Information Entrepreneur
Flash of Genius: The Information Entrepreneur

SCOTT YARA
Vice-president, Products and Co-founder, Greenplum

The era of big data presents incredible opportunities -- smarter cities, stronger companies, faster medicine -- but just as many challenges. Storage is scarce, systems overloaded, governments and businesses know too much. The world now contains unimaginably vast amounts of digital information, which is growing exponentially. Managed well, this data can be used to engineer new engines of economic value, unlock scientific breakthroughs, and hold politicians accountable. Managed poorly, it can cause great harm.

The financial crisis showed that complex models that analyze large quantities of data do not always reflect financial risk in the real world. The financial crisis was sparked by big data -- and there will be others. But the data deluge will also generate millions of new ideas for how to solve big problems, build new markets, and expand existing ones. Ideas Economy: Information is a fresh look at knowledge management for the information age.

The Economist will bring together theorists, strategists, and innovators who understand how to harness data to create value and advance individual, corporate, and social good. We will sift through the vast quantities of current thinking on data to uncover the best ways forward. And we will apply the lessons of the Ideas Economy, about innovation, human capital, and intelligent infrastructure, to uncover new sources of growth and accelerate human progress across the globe.
Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2011 09:15:00 -0700
Location: Santa Clara, CA, Santa Clara Convention Center, Economist
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/06/08/Flash_of_Genius_The_Information_Entrepreneur

May 25 2011

10:53

The local culture of the global internet

The-internet-of-elsewhere.jpg

Jacob Aron, technology reporter

THE internet allows nearly everyone on the planet to publish and access information from almost anywhere, forging its users into one giant, global culture. Or so we are led to believe. As Cyrus Farivar tells it in The Internet of Elsewhere, a number of nations have been transformed by getting online - but for some the results couldn't be more different.

South Korea became a modern-day cyber-future, with televised video-game tournaments and plans for a city where even the doors and garbage bins are networked. Contrast that with Senegal, which relies on public cybercafes rather than home connections, despite being one of the most wired countries in Africa. In Estonia, a nationwide blanket of free and open Wi-Fi provided the perfect environment to foster the development of Skype. How different from the tightly controlled Iranian internet, where blogging against the government can see you thrown in jail.

What is also remarkable is the way these international flavours of the internet differ from the vision driven by Silicon Valley. The internet of South Korea and Estonia is more advanced than that of the US, with higher speeds and better services, but in many cases that's a result of culture, not technology. As Farivar says, it's hard to imagine American civil libertarians accepting a national digital identity card scheme like Estonia's as a trade-off for access to services such as online voting.

Farivar makes the case that, rather than equalising cultural values, the internet is filtered through each nation's differences, providing each of us with a local view of the global network.


Book Information
The Internet of Elsewhere
by Cyrus Farivar
Rutgers University Press
£22.95/$25.95


Tags: book internet

May 07 2011

01:02

Advancing the New Machine: Communication Blackouts

Advancing the New Machine: Communication Blackouts
As the 2007 protests in Burma, the 2009-2010 post-election demonstrations in Iran, and recent events in Tunisia and Egypt have stunningly demonstrated, the Internet and mobile phones have become powerful tools to bring together those whose freedom is being denied. Social networks have been used to organize protests, and new media have been widely used to document the unfolding of those attempts at establishing a new period of rule of law and political freedom. In response to these threats, governments have successfully monitored cellphone networks and attempted to shut down Internet access, posing a threat to the security of human rights activists. This panel will discuss how people can communicate in face of a complete shutdown of key communication infrastructures imposed by their government.

Panelists:

Yahel Ben-David (AirJaldi.Org)

Subramanian Lakshminarayanan (NYU)

Eric Blantz (Inveneo)

Kathleen Reen (Internews)


Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2011 15:45:00 -0700
Location: Berkeley, CA, Stephens Hall, Human Rights Center UC Berkeley
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/04/26/Advancing_the_New_Machine_Communication_Blackouts

May 03 2011

22:24

Khan Academy's Salman Khan: The Real YouTube Revolution

Khan Academy's Salman Khan: The Real YouTube Revolution
The Real YouTube Revolution: A New Way to Teach Everything

Salman Khan, Founder, Khan Academy
in conversation with Clive Thompson, Contributing Editor, WIRED
Date: Tue, 03 May 2011 16:00:00 -0700
Location: New York, NY, Museum of Jewish Heritage, WIRED
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/05/03/Khan_Academys_Salman_Khan_The_Real_YouTube_Revolution

April 04 2011

12:04

How will you cope, living with your avatar?

Samantha Murphy, contributor

200067705-001.jpg

(Image: Adrian Weinbrecht/Stone/Gretty)

In Infinite Reality, Jim Blascovich and Jeremy Bailenson map the exciting possibilities and daunting downsides of ever more realistic virtual worlds

Hello, future. Gaming systems that drop you into another world, such as Microsoft's Kinect or Nintendo's Wii, are just the beginning of what virtual-reality technology has to offer. Get ready for virtual immortality, teleportation, time travel and the ability to be in two places at once.

But everything comes at a price. There are those who already worry about how this technology is affecting our brains. And once the digital versions of us become indistinguishable from our real selves, what might this do to our societies?

Two of virtual reality's most prominent researchers have come together to sketch out the landscape of an emerging field I call psychotech - the place where psychology and technology collide to produce something new and exciting. Social and cognitive psychologists Jim Blascovich and Jeremy Bailenson detail the current research - primarily their own - and pose some fascinating questions, which have surprising and important answers.


Do people treat digital representations of humans as if they were real? Do we have the same expectations of virtual others as of real people? If something occurs in a virtual environment, does that make the experience less authentic, or are our brains just as susceptible to virtual fear, love and trauma? And ultimately, now that we are able to create avatars in our own image and set them loose in virtual worlds to do our bidding, should we be held accountable for their independent actions?

This isn't just a whimsical exercise in philosophy. The practical applications of immersive virtual reality are already helping people across the globe - and future applications are limited only by the imagination, the authors say.

Imagine a classroom in which the learning conditions are individually tailored for each student. Via their own portal, everyone in the group feels as though the class is designed just for them, leading to less distraction and better grades.

Or what if you never had to endure another disappointing internet shopping experience? Remember that shirt that looked perfect on the model, but turned out to be all wrong when you received it in the post? Soon some internet shops will allow you to shop in 3D virtual environments in which you can pick virtual products off virtual shelves, gaining instant information on size, colour and proportions, as your realistically shaped avatar turns it over in its hands - or even tries it on.

Blascovich and Bailenson aren't naive optimists, though. They warn that as avatars become a larger part of our daily lives, we will also become more susceptible to identity theft, privacy violations and high-tech, individualised guerrilla marketing delivered by your virtual self.

Infinite Reality starts with a short discussion of the history of virtual reality, builds to a broad overview of the research literature and ends with a road map of the near future. Sadly, at some points the pace slows to an academic crawl: at times I found myself instinctively reaching for a highlighter to mark key phrases, as if they might show up in an exam question later. But it is well worth wading through these brief textbook passages. The second half of the book picks up speed, illustrating the ground-breaking research with vivid imagery and inspiring analysis.

We have long used science fiction to live out our wildest dreams. Now, with virtual reality, we can experience them for ourselves. And if Blascovich and Bailenson are right, it's as good as the real thing. And maybe infinitely better.

Samantha Murphy is a freelance writer based in Pennsylvania


Book Information
Infinite Reality: Avatars, eternal life, new worlds, and the dawn of a virtual revolution
by Jim Blascovich and Jeremy Bailenson
William Morrow
£15.99/$27.99


March 18 2011

22:37

Facebook In-Depth Module 1: The Big Picture

Facebook In-Depth Module 1: The Big Picture
The Playbook for a Global Facebook Strategy
MICHAEL LAZEROW
CEO, Buddy Media

The Most Innovative Integrated Facebook Campaigns
LAUREN INDVIK
Editor, Mashable

Four Predictions
SCOTT GALLOWAY
Founder, L2

2010 was the year of Facebook. In 2010, Facebook overtook Google as the most popular U.S destination on the Internet and also started commanding the largest market share of online display ads in the U.S. With more than 500 million active global users sharing 30 billion pieces of content (web links, news stories, blog posts, notes, photo albums, etc.) every month, Facebook has become the default operating system of the Internet. Furthermore, with several major brands receiving more traffic to their Facebook pages than their branded URLs, building a compelling Facebook strategy has become an increasingly important part of marketing your brand and connecting with consumers.

Facebook, In-Depth is an intensive clinic that educates marketers and senior management on the world's largest social network. L2 invites an unprecedented group of scholars, thinkers, entrepreneurs, technologists, and exemplar brands to put together a daylong curriculum on Facebook.
Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 00:00:00 -0700
Location: New York, New York, NYU Stern, L2
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/03/18/Facebook_In-Depth_Module_1_The_Big_Picture
21:29

Facebook In-Depth Module 3: Best Practices & Case Studies

Facebook In-Depth Module 3: Best Practices & Case Studies
Power Tools for Facebook
JEFF RAGOVIN
CRO, Buddy Media

The Prestige Industry on Facebook
MAUREEN MULLEN
Lead Researcher, L2

2010 was the year of Facebook. In 2010, Facebook overtook Google as the most popular U.S destination on the Internet and also started commanding the largest market share of online display ads in the U.S. With more than 500 million active global users sharing 30 billion pieces of content (web links, news stories, blog posts, notes, photo albums, etc.) every month, Facebook has become the default operating system of the Internet. Furthermore, with several major brands receiving more traffic to their Facebook pages than their branded URLs, building a compelling Facebook strategy has become an increasingly important part of marketing your brand and connecting with consumers.

Facebook, In-Depth is an intensive clinic that educates marketers and senior management on the world's largest social network. L2 invites an unprecedented group of scholars, thinkers, entrepreneurs, technologists, and exemplar brands to put together a daylong curriculum on Facebook.
Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 00:00:00 -0700
Location: New York, NY, NYU Stern, L2
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/03/18/Facebook_In-Depth_Module_3_Best_Practices__Case_Studies
18:27

Facebook In-Depth Module 2: Facebook Extensions

Facebook In-Depth Module 2: Facebook Extensions
Gamification: The Secrets of Facebook Games
GABE ZICHERMANN
Author, Game-Based Marketing

Everywhere Commerce: Facebook & Beyond
NITA ROLLINS
Futurist, Resource Interactive

Facebook Places: "The Killer App"
JAMIE TEDFORD
CEO, Brand Networks

2010 was the year of Facebook. In 2010, Facebook overtook Google as the most popular U.S destination on the Internet and also started commanding the largest market share of online display ads in the U.S. With more than 500 million active global users sharing 30 billion pieces of content (web links, news stories, blog posts, notes, photo albums, etc.) every month, Facebook has become the default operating system of the Internet. Furthermore, with several major brands receiving more traffic to their Facebook pages than their branded URLs, building a compelling Facebook strategy has become an increasingly important part of marketing your brand and connecting with consumers.

Facebook, In-Depth is an intensive clinic that educates marketers and senior management on the world's largest social network. L2 invites an unprecedented group of scholars, thinkers, entrepreneurs, technologists, and exemplar brands to put together a daylong curriculum on Facebook.
Date: Fri, 18 Mar 2011 00:00:00 -0700
Location: New York, NY, NYU Stern, L2
Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2011/03/18/Facebook_In-Depth_Module_2_Facebook_Extensions

March 04 2011

20:07
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.
(PRO)
No Soup for you

Don't be the product, buy the product!

close
YES, I want to SOUP ●UP for ...